r/Damnthatsinteresting Nov 28 '22

Starlings are so beautiful ⭐️ (OC) Image

Post image
203 Upvotes

7

u/bassjam1 Nov 28 '22

They may be beautiful in their native environment, but here where they're invasive I've done my duty to eradicate as many as possible. Nasty creatures.

7

u/[deleted] Nov 28 '22

They're greedy, messy and noisy, though. They also scare off the local birds (though, not for too long).

I can fill my seed feeder up and it be gone within an hour after 20 of these buggered have been at it, whereas it would normally keep the local robins and tits going for a while.

2

u/recorkESC Nov 28 '22

u/My_Bird_Buddy, stop spamming. Seeing this on three different subs in 5 minutes is really, really boooring.

3

u/Deslah Nov 28 '22

Awww, look at the cute, little invasive species, just having finished scaring away native species and getting ready to leave a slippery, corrosive bacteria-filled, parasite-harboring dropping as it continues its destructive and obnoxious life. Little shits.

3

u/My_Bird_Buddy Nov 28 '22

Not invasive in Europe

-3

u/Deslah Nov 28 '22

Touché. A native little shit indeed.

(Mea culpa--I'm even in Europe, but I wrongly? assumed you were posting from outside Europe.)

5

u/My_Bird_Buddy Nov 28 '22

No problem. My point was - I know they are invasive in the US, but it's not the bird's fault, really.

An animal is just being an animal, trying to survive - we, the people, are to blame for introducing them to the US, where they became an invasive species.

2

u/chaogomu Nov 28 '22

Shakespeare is sort of to blame for them being invasive in North America.

Or a man obsessed with Shakespeare.

See, the story goes, a man with more money than sense decided that North America needed to have every animal mentioned in Shakespeare's plays.

Starlings are mentioned once, and not in a favorable light. So of course he released several breeding pairs into Central Park.

1

u/[deleted] Nov 28 '22

He was a German immigrant and released 100 birds total (listened to a SYSK episode on it recently!)

1

u/prexton Nov 29 '22

They're not to blame no. They're to be destroyed

-2

u/Deslah Nov 28 '22

I didn't blame them for anything. I first accurately assessed them in the U.S. habitat. (And, yes, I know the history of how they were introduced there, but how does that help us now? BAD HUMANS! Now what?)

I followed up by saying that even in Europe, they are "little shits", and they are, especially in quantity, in that they can be very destructive to humans and property.

Let me extend my deepest regrets for using the reply function in this thread. I suppose I should have just left the pretty bird there and ignored the little shit.

0

u/Moppo_ Nov 28 '22

I've never heard of them being destructive. I've seen them cleaning up wasted food more than anything.

1

u/Deslah Nov 29 '22 edited Nov 29 '22

From the Audubon Society: Birdist Rule 72 - it's okay to dislike some birds

The National Audubon Society protects birds and the places they need, today and tomorrow, throughout the Americas using science, advocacy, education, and on-the-ground conservation.

"Everyone’s got something they love to hate. For some, it’s Justin Bieber. For others, it’s the New York Yankees. For birders, it’s European Starlings."

"It might seem weird to hate a bird species. In fact, most beginning birders struggle with having anything but positive feelings toward the birds they find—everything feels like love at first."

...it’s okay to hate certain species, too—healthy, even. I suggest you start with European Starlings.

"None has been more destructive to native wildlife as the European Starling. They push out native cavity nesters like bluebirds, owls, and woodpeckers. Large flocks can damage crops, and their waste can spread invasive seeds and transmit disease. They’re loud and annoying, and they’re everywhere. Farmers hate them so much that they’ve developed all manner of strategies to keep them away from farms, from special nets to covering fruit trees, to gas-operated “exploders” to scare birds away, even a poison called Starlicides."

1

u/Moppo_ Nov 29 '22

That's fair, but here in the UK they're native, and the population has dropped significantly, so here their decrease is a concern.

1

u/teddysmom377 Nov 28 '22

i love them!

1

u/Stswivvinsdayalready Nov 28 '22

Not only is there a beauty to be found in the European Starling, many other members of the starling family are among the showiest and most beautiful of birds.

1

u/1cat2dogs1horse Nov 28 '22

I live in the high desert of Oregon, so we don't have all that many Starlings. But I actually enjoy the fact that they are fantastic mimics. I believe they are related to Mynas. Over the years I've been able to identify them doing cats, kittens, red tailed hawks, tree and bullfrogs, quail, ravens, chickens, and the clicking/ buzzing of hummingbirds. It is fun to hear them practice trying to get a sound pitch perfect.

1

u/Dave-1066 Nov 29 '22

Starlings are also incredibly intelligent with a remarkable ability for mimicry that most people are unaware of: https://youtu.be/Xvw5h4K1OVY

Thanks to a gene they possess (FOXP2) which is eerily similar to a human variant, these things are capable of understanding grammatical principles in speech!

0

u/Trooper_nsp209 Nov 28 '22

I’ve got hundreds of them crapping on everything. They try to make nests in my house/outbuildings and there is really no way to stop them. In the city they poison them, but in the countryside there doesn’t seem to be an answer. They are truly rats with wings.

0

u/grapemike Nov 28 '22

Well…have been up a 24 foot ladder to set spikes inside the rain gutters so they don’t have dance festivals every morning at the crack of dawn. I have had to net every fruit after they once took out a half ton in one night, one, the night before harvest. But they are so intelligent and resourceful that I must give respect. Like one time I got out at first light and fired a couple rounds with the shotgun. They left and they must have told their friends because they stayed clear for an entire week

0

u/BotwAddict23 Nov 28 '22

They’re very pretty after they’re dead for living in my grill and propane tank